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Teens and Cyber Safety

Teens will explore the Internet.

The ready availability of virtually anything and the generally unrestricted access the Internet provides is an irresistible draw to any teenager looking to explore. As a parent, you need to do what you can to keep them safe. Clever teens will get around nearly any form of parental control placed on the computer. It’s better in the long run, and much easier in the short term, to teach your teens to use the Internet safely.

1: Virus Protection.

The Internet is full of threats. Viruses show up all over the place, from e-mail attachments to embedded in downloads to fake programs. It’s essential that any computer your teen uses have adequate virus protection installed and kept up to date. It won’t stop a virus from being willfully — if accidentally — installed, but it will help eliminate most threats.

2: Safety Add-Ons. 

There are a number of utilities that can help make browsing technically safer. Spybot: Search & Destroy has an excellent immunization feature that blocks known danger pages from ever loading. Adblock+ is an add-on for most browsers that removes advertisements, including those embedded with malicious code. A good firewall can also help keep threats out.

3: Safe Browsing Habits.

Even the most sophisticated protection in the world won’t stop dedicated human error. It’s best to educate your teens on some safe browsing habits. Some good lessons include “if the virus scanner stops the download, don’t download it again,” “don’t download e-mail attachments from anyone you don’t know,” “learn to recognize advertisements pretending to be legitimate content,” and more.

4: Withholding Information.

The most dangerous thing a teen can do online is give out sensitive information to someone willing to misuse it. Teach them never to give out sensitive information. This information includes passwords, full real names, social security numbers, phone numbers, credit card numbers, usernames and other identity information. Anyone who has a legitimate reason to need some of that information can get it in other ways. No one will ever ask for it through e-mail unless they’re trying to steal it.

5: Complex Passwords.

Bad passwords are easy to guess, easy to brute force break and easy to steal. Good passwords are harder to remember, and people tend to write them down or set them to input automatically, which can be just as dangerous. Teach your teens to use good passwords and remember them. It doesn’t have to be a messy combination of letters, numbers and symbols. A good password might simply be a long phrase with capitalized words, a number and some punctuation. Such a password is easy to remember and hard to guess.

Accidents will happen. Everyone steps outside their boundaries at some point in their life. With some education and some safe browsing habits, your teen will learn firsthand after a major virus, and not identity theft or something more dangerous.

Special contributor: Paul Taylor

Author Bio:

Paul and his wife Julie both spend quite a bit of time coming up with ideas, blogging, and researching all things related to childcare. They take care of all the necessary information related to “babysittingjobs.com/”. He personally thinks his blog will help finding information on all things related to a babysitter.

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How to POKE Someone Without Touching Them

Parenting teens is not easy.

Getting them to listen can be more of a challenge.

Many times you feel like shaking them and asking them if they are listening, however you know better than to touch them – but what about a ‘poke?’

If you’re trying to get someone’s attention, reaching over and giving them a good poke in the ribs is a surefire way to successfully grab it. The physical interruption of their focused train of thought works better than anything else, unless, of course, they are fully immersed in their favorite video game.

For those in the ‘video zone’, it generally takes much more than a slight physical irritation to break their concentration. But you don’t always have to make physical contact with someone to get their attention; there are several other ways to get someone’s attention, or ‘poke’ them, without actually touching them.

Here are five:

  1. Facebook – Poking has been a part of Facebook since the beginning, and new people still ask what the purpose or message is meant to be with a Facebook POKE. The big secret is: there is none. A poke on Facebook is simply an attempt to recreate the physical poke in the ribs in a virtual environment. It’s simply an annoying little blip in the middle of your world that says someone wants to get your attention, and probably for no real reason. If this has ‘disappeared’ in the latest version, it is likely that no one noticed, because it seems to have lost its appeal anyways.
  2. Text – Sending a text message to someone is probably the most common means of ‘poking’ someone in the digital age. It is silent (except for the little message notification) like the physical poke. It is quick and fairly unobtrusive. It has the added benefit of actual communication along with the ‘poke’, which replaces the previous nod of the head, pointing of the finger, or mouthing words that the other person strained to decipher from your lips; definitely an improvement in the poking arena.
  3. Tweet A tweet is similar to a text message to someone; however it is more often used as a group poke to catch the attention of any of your followers who might be paying attention to your 140 character attention grabber.
  4. Whistle – A bit old school, but this usually still works in a crowd. A good strong whistle between the fingers can break through an awful lot of chatter and catch the attention of someone who might be totally out of reach for a physical poke in the side. Not everyone has mastered this skill, but there is usually someone within a group of friends who possesses the capability to deliver this ‘poke’ through the air.
  5. Face-to-face – For the aforementioned video-gamer and others who are strongly engrossed in their own fantasy world, a face-to-face blockage of their direct line of view may be the most effective means of gaining their attention. This may require some effort on your part to keep them from trying to simply bend their view around the interference in their visual line of sight. Eventually, though, they do come to realize that the object is a person and not simply an apparition, and you may receive some response from them at this point… just don’t expect it to be polite.

There are bigger and more creative ways of getting someone’s attention, of course. Billboards along the highway, sky writing, and announcements over PA systems have also been used, but those are a bit more extreme than just a ‘poke’.

Source: Internet Service Providers

Texting: Surprising Facts About Texting and Your Kids

You probably already have a few pretty good ideas about text messaging.

For instance, you know walking while texting can be tricky, and you know texting in your college courses has a negative impact on your grades. You didn’t need a study to tell you so, but researchers went ahead and did them anyway. But not all the research done on the subject can be filed under “Obvious.”

Here are 15 scholarly facts about texting that you may not have suspected.

  1. Getting a text makes you happier: It shouldn’t be too much of a surprise to learn that receiving a text message from a close friend makes you happier, but now we have the research to confirm it. Berkeley psychologists found even sending a text message makes people feel more connected and causes an upswing in mood.
  2. Hypertexters are less healthy: Texting may make you happier, but those who do it too much seem prone to unhealthy habits. Case Western Reserve School of Medicine concluded a study in 2010 that found “hypertexting” — sending more than 120 messages a day — can “have dangerous health effects on teenagers.” Hypertexters were found to be more likely to engage in harmful behaviors like binge drinking (43% more likely) and drug use (41% more likely).
  3. Texting behind the wheel is even riskier than we thought: Few things are as distracting to a motorist as trying to read or send a text message. Researchers at Texas A&M University’s Texas Transportation Institute now say, based on their study, that texting while driving double’s a driver’s reaction time. In the test, drivers using their phones were 11 times more likely to miss a flashing traffic light than focused drivers.
  4. Texting while driving killed 16,000 in a six-year period: Exactly measuring the number of traffic deaths caused by texting is impossible, but researchers from the University of North Texas Health Science Center have put the number at 16,000 between 2001 and 2007. Their findings were compiled based on information from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and were published in the American Journal of Public Health. They estimated that in 2008 alone, 5,870 people died as a result of drivers distracted by texting.
  5. Texters use fewer abbreviations than we thought: Three universities are currently partnering to determine whether it’s true that cell phone communication is really ruining the way we write. The study began in December 2011, and head researcher Christian Guilbault of Simon Fraser University in British Columbia says the research has already revealed some interesting info. It turns out people don’t resort to shorthand as often as we might think. “See you” is used four times as often as “C U,” and of 12 variations of the word “OK,” “okay” is the most common.
  6. Black people send the most text messages: The Nielsen Company looked at monthly cell phone bills of 60,000 users in the U.S. and determined that African-Americans send more texts than Hispanics, whites, and Asian-Americans. The 790 text messages they send per month, on average, is more than twice the amount sent by Asian-Americans, who send an average of 384 per month.
  7. Texting helps HIV sufferers take their meds: A study that recently appeared in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews found that sending HIV patients weekly text messages to remind them to take medicine and to ask them how they are doing can help them stick to their antiretroviral therapy treatment plans. Researchers at UC-San Francisco’s Global Health Sciences recommend hospitals text patients on the treatment, which has tough side effects, but is also critical to survival.
  8. Texters don’t believe that’s a word: Blame it on autocorrect. A University of Calgary student did a study of texters and word usage, expecting to find that texting encouraged “unrestrained language.” Instead, the results showed people who text more are more likely to reject new words rather than accepting them as possible words. The people who were more open to a range of new words were readers of traditional media like magazines and books.
  9. Texting makes it easier to lie: The Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia recently published the results of their study that paired students playing roles of stockbroker and buyer, with the stockbroker needing to unload a stock that will soon lose 50% of its value. Deals done via texting were 31% more likely to involve lies than those by face-to-face talks. And buyers who were lied to via text proved to be much angrier than buyers lied to in person.
  10. Many people are addicted to texting: Researchers at the University of Maryland studied 200 students after 24 hours of no texting or other media. They found many of them were basically experiencing withdrawal, anxiety, and difficulty functioning. Dr. David Greenfield of the Center for Internet Behavior has compared constant texting and checking email to gambling addiction.
  11. Most people still prefer a phone call: Nearly three-fourths of American adults text. However, while 31% say they prefer to be contacted by text message, fully half of adults still prefer a good old phone call. The findings were the result of a study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, the first such time the group has polled Americans’ on their contact method of choice.
  12. Banning texting while driving is not the answer: At least one group of researchers is making a case against laws banning texting while driving. Researchers at the Swedish National Road and Transport Institute found that driver education is more effective than a ban, partly because people would disobey a law and partly because hands-free devices meant to replace texting as a safer alternative do not actually lower crash figures.
  13. Female teens text the most: Perhaps the only surprising thing here is that it’s older teenage girls, not pre-teen girls, who send the most texts of any group. Girls 14-17 send a median of 100 texts a day. Pew’s Internet and American Life Project also discovered that 87% of all teens in this age group have a cell phone, while only 57% of 12- and 13-year-olds have one.
  14. Texting has spawned its own injury: Texting is convenient, but it could also be a pain in the neck. Dr. Dean Fishman has trademarked the phrase “text neck” to describe an ailment he is seeing conflicting more and more patients. He even started the Text Neck Institute in Florida to treat pain in the neck, back, arms, and shoulders of frequent texters. “Forward head posture” pain, his original diagnosis, did not catch on.
  15. Predictive texting changes children’s brains: Using the built-in dictionary when texting on a cell phone makes children prone to making more mistakes. An epidemiologist from Monash University in Melbourne studied children ages 11-14 who sent 20 texts a week and found that the autocorrect technology makes children more impulsive and less accurate in their learning.

Source: Online College Courses

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Start Kids Online Young: 10 Reasons Way This is Important

Let’s face it, the Internet is here to stay!

Much has been made of the potentially hazardous landscape for children that is the internet, and rightly so. Parents do need to be concerned about how their children make use of this valuable tool, and a valuable tool it surely is.

No longer a luxury but a basic necessity that each person will need to familiarize himself with in order to function in our society. That’s why it’s important that new generations become tech savvy at as early an age as is practical.

Let’s look at ten reasons kids should be online at an early age:

  1. Research Tool – For school studies, projects or as a general educational aid, there is just no substitute for the worldwide web. It’s the primary means by which information is disseminated in the 21st century. Kids need to know how to use it as soon as possible.
  2. Social Networking – Like it or not, more of a child’s socializing will occur online with each passing year. It should never fully subjugate personal interaction, of course, but we cannot ignore the significance of the internet in today’s society, especially as it applies to young people.
  3. Getting Acquainted – Like anything else a kid is expected to master, navigating the internet safely should be something that a parent and child can work on together. If a child becomes acclimated to the internet early on under supervision, she will have less chance of stumbling into trouble later out of ignorance or naiveté.
  4. Interest Groups – Your child can benefit from involvement with the right kind of crowds when he meets other kids with similar interests in forums or on websites where they gather and share information.
  5. It Will Demystify the Web – The sooner a child is inducted into cyberspace, the better equipped she will be to incorporate it into her life later as she matures and needs to rely on it more.
  6. It’s a perfect Vehicle For a Child to Discover Interests – and possibly a lifelong vocation. Prior generations could go years without ever having heard about fields of study or interests that might appeal to them. It can be done in a matter of days, if not hours, online.
  7. Education – Beyond its functionality as a study aid, the internet can be an instructional tool for itself as well. That is, children can learn the protocols and hazards related to its use, both in formal training at school and at home with their parents.
  8. Balanced Perspective – The alternative to addressing an area of concern early on – as in the case of sex ed or drugs –  is for a child to learn on his own, via his peers, or at best, through an education that comes too late to avert the consequences of his ignorance. A child with an early introduction to the internet at least starts off with some frame of reference with which to work later.
  9. Cyber-bullying – The unfortunate reality is that a lot of cruelty and mean-spirited behavior is prevalent online. It stands to reason that children who learn to use the internet for social networking at an early age can better identify, with the help of parents and teachers, the situations they should avoid.
  10. E-commerce – Kids will be growing up in a world where conducting business of every kind, from paying utility bills to buying groceries, will be done on the web. They need to learn the ropes as soon as possible.

Source:  Share A Nanny

If your child starts asking to be part of a social network, there is an age appropriate place for them you can consider.

Yourpshere.com is one of the fasting growing social networking sites for kids.  The benefits are endless, their priorities are the safety of your child and their information.  The founder, Mary Kay Hoal, a mother of five children, created Yoursphere.com as well as Yoursphere for Parents which is full of educational materials and information to keep you up-to-date on today’s gadgets and how to keep up with the ever changing privacy settings of the Internet.

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Video Games: 10 Ways They Help Kids

The article last week gives you the list of reasons, or I should say a list of videos games you should avoid…. this week let’s look at the positive side of video games.

Video games get a bad rap. 

All of the experts will have you think that video games will rot the minds of our youth.  We’re being told as parents to limit our kids’ screen time to an hour a day.

Really?  Only an hour?

That amount of time is enough for one prime time show with the family or two shows on Disney.  That doesn’t include time to play with the Wii or the DS.  That doesn’t allow any time for working on the computer either.  I’m no expert, but I would say our kids would be better off if we just monitored what they are playing and watching.  Obviously no one wants their child glued to the TV or video game all day, but I don’t think 4-5 hours a day doing various things is a big deal.

Check out 10 ways video games help kids.

  1. Develop hand/eye coordination: Video games do an amazing job of developing our kids’ hand/eye coordination.  The skill that they have to figure out how far and how fast they need to jump in order to land in just the right place.  The examples are endless.  Nearly every video game works on hand/eye coordination.
  2. Problem solving: Many of the games include an element that must be figured out in order to win the game.  Not just win the game, but to progress through the various levels.  Games like Diabolical Box contain complex puzzles all throughout the game that have to be solved in order to get all of the pieces to solve the end mystery.
  3. Spatial awareness: Figuring out how to maneuver through mazes and worlds collecting coins or objects or tools is difficult.  The trick is to be aware of where you are and where you have already been because these games are timed as well.  You can’t spend all day going over and over the same landscapes.
  4. Logical thinking: Various games will require kids to figure out the logical progression of how a game works.  If I do this then I’m able to achieve higher results than if I don’t use any of the tools.  Something to that effect.
  5. Teaches strategy: Soccer on a video game is a lot like soccer in real life.  The same strategies that are used on the video game can be incorporated on the real soccer field.  Playing the game kids learn which players are the best players and who will score the best against a particular team or defender.  The more the child plays the game the more strategies they will learn.
  6. Decision making: Kids constantly have to make decisions while playing a video game.  If they make the wrong decision their character loses a life.  They have to decide which road to take and which tool to use.  They need to be able to make split decisions on the spot in order to progress in the game.
  7. Learn a foreign language: So many of the video games are created in Asian countries and many of the game’s words throughout the game are in a foreign language.  Kids learn these words.  Can they carry on a conversation in Chinese because they played a video game?  No, but learning foreign words often sheds light on your own language.
  8. Learn history:  Many games are based on real life places and things.  In SIM games or simulation games you create a civilization, an amusement park or some other setting.  Learning from places that exist in real life helps the child create a better SIM world.
  9. Improving self-esteem:  When a child beats a video game or is doing really well on a video game their self-esteem will soar.  They are so excited when they complete a level or beat an entire game.  This is something they can talk about with their peers at school and they will feel better about themselves when they are able to talk about the different things they went through in the game and how they were able to figure things out.
  10. Outlet for creativity: There are many games that are related to art and design.  Even young children can get in on the act; there is a Barbie fashion game where you can work on creating different looks for Barbie and her friends.  Then you can put together a fashion show.  The game makes this all possible for a 6 year old to do.  The kids just think it’s fun, but they are actually learning great planning and organization skills too.

Source:  Babysitter.net

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Online Privacy: 7 Laws that impact your virtual life

How much information do “they” have about you based on your email and other internet use? You might be surprised to find out. You also might be surprised to know that the internet is largely unregulated by the federal government and policies are mostly underdeveloped.

Because the U.S Supreme Court leans more in favor of the right to free speech, they have taken a hands-off approach to regulation when it comes to the internet and online privacy. There are laws that regulate the use of such things as child pornography and online gambling, but it is important to realize that most laws are issued by individual states rather than being comprehensive and federally issued.

The following is a list of 7 laws that impact our online privacy.

  1. The federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA): From 1986, this complicated law containing many exceptions makes it unlawful under certain circumstances for someone to read or disclose the contents of an electronic communication (18 USC 2511). It notes the difference between an email in transit, and one that is stored on a computer, which means that a private email may be read, if there is the suspicion that the sender is trying to damage the system or another user, but the random monitoring of email is not acceptable.
  2. The USA PATRIOT Act: This act, passed by Congress after the attacks of September 11, 2001 and amended in 2006, gives the government easier access to records about online activity. It also expanded the types of records that can be obtained without a court order.
  3. Electronic Funds Transfer Act: Requires the financial institution to communicate with the account holder all information as it applies to the account- fines, charges, usage, etc. They must provide documentation of all account transactions. They must set forth a plan to promptly address any error on all accounts. It also addresses civil and criminal liability as well as administrative enforcement and congressional reports.
  4. State laws regarding the treatment of personal information are held by Minnesota and Nevada who both require Internet Service Providers (ISP’s) to get permission before sharing certain information concerning their customers. They also prohibit disclosure of personally identifying information, and Minnesota does not allow disclosing information about visited websites.
  5. California and Utah require all nonfinancial businesses to disclose to the customer the types of personal information they will share or sell to a third party, either for compensation or direct marketing purposes.
  6. Connecticut and Delaware have laws that require employers to give notice to employees before they monitor e-mail communications or Internet access.
  7. Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998: This law protects children by requiring web operators who gather information from children to get consent from a parent or guardian and permit the parent to disallow the collection of such information. They are also required to disclose the purpose of gathered information.

While the laws governing personal privacy online are, in many cases, still undeveloped, as internet users, we must be careful to protect our own privacy. Many tools are available for that purpose. From computer virus protection and firewalls to choosing strict controls and strong passwords, you can enjoy all the benefits the internet has to offer without being victimized by the unsavory aspects.

Source:  My ISP Finder

Is your teen sharing too much online?

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Education through Mobile Learning

Teachers and administrators have been bringing technology into the classroom for decades now, but with the advent of cloud computing and the proliferation of smaller, more portable computers and Internet-capable devices, it’s now possible to bring the classroom into the technology instead.

Mobile learning, sometimes abbreviated to M-Learning, focuses on learning through mobile devices, allowing learners to move about in a classroom or remotely learn from any location of their choice. It’s a movement that’s gained a lot of steam in recent years, and despite some criticisms, isn’t like to fade fast – especially as new technologies that make mobile learning more practical continue to emerge and the popularity of remote learning opportunities like online colleges continue to grow.

Whether you’re a teacher or a student, you’ve undoubtedly heard talk about mobile learning and may be wondering what it means for the future of education, whether in grade school, colleges or the workplace. While the applications of M-Learning are growing all the time, we’ve highlighted some of the major trends here to help you learn more about how mobile learning is shaping the 21st century classroom – and may change how we teach, learn and interact in any educational environment.

  1. Location-based integration. Mobile learning has taken to the streets, with technologies that allow for seamless integration with a wide range of locations. One of the best uses of this technology has been within museums, where visitors can use a mobile device to listen to information about items in the museum’s collection. The American Museum of Natural History in New York is one museum with an especially rich mobile tool, guiding users turn-by-turn to the best pieces in the museum’s collection and enhancing the experience of visiting. Of course, mobile integration isn’t just for museums. Some colleges are using it to create high-tech tours for visiting students and their families. With millions of smartphone users and the number growing larger each year, this trend is likely to grow as more businesses and organizations work enrich patron experience.
  2. Online class management. Online class management systems like Moodle and Blackboard have grown exponentially in their number of users in recent years. Part of the popularity stems from the ability to not only access and update student records from a computer, but from mobile devices like a phone or an iPad as well. Students, teachers and parents alike can easily check grades, upload assignments and check on homework through the assessment tools, making them not only more accessible, but more practical for anyone involved in the educational process.
  3. The domination of ebooks. Amazon.com is one of the biggest retailers of books, but in the past year, their sales of ebooks has outstripped that of traditional books. The same holds true for bookselling giant Barnes and Noble. The ebook is steadily becoming a popular part of everyday life for so many Americans, and the digital book is slowly making its way into the classroom as well. Some states, like California, have proposed replacing student textbooks with ebooks. Not only could it be a big money saver, it may help eliminate the problem of student textbooks becoming quickly outdated as new discoveries are made, something every teacher and child can appreciate.
  4. Cloud computing in schools. These days, cloud computing is a pretty big buzzword, with big tech companies like Microsoft and Apple pushing their devices and applications — and schools haven’t ignored the hype. Schools are increasingly looking to cloud computing as a way to provide access to information and to close budget gaps. An inexpensive solution, cloud computing is becoming the norm everywhere from grade schools to grad schools, perhaps because it is not only simple to use, but mobile as well. Information on the cloud, whether its lesson plans or class projects, can be accessed from anywhere, anytime and on any mobile device. In an increasingly mobile world and classroom, cloud computing is more than just a trend, and is likely to become the standard in information management over the next decade.
  5. Bring your own device classrooms. Since most kids these days already have access to a mobile device, schools are seizing the opportunity to turn these gadgets from distractions into learning tools by incorporating these devices into classroom lessons and projects. From mobile phones to laptop computers, teachers and students are increasingly bringing technology to the classroom, and in many school districts, it’s being put to good use. Numerous studies have highlighted the benefits of one-to-one computing programs in raising test scores and increasing college attendance, but with many districts strapped for cash and unable to provide devices for each student, this isn’t always a possibility. The solution may be found in asking students to bring their own devices to class, cutting back on the number of mobile devices the school needs to provide while still enhancing the learning experience.
  6. Online collaborative learning. There aren’t a lot of places these days that are devoid of an Internet connection, and many people can now access the web from, well, anywhere they can get a cell phone signal. Schools are embracing the web as a learning tool in a variety of ways, but one particularly exciting one has been the growth of online collaborative learning. This can mean a variety of things, but in many cases it involves students each participating in a project on the web. Numerous classrooms have taken to collaboratively blogging about projects and ideas in the classroom. Others have produced their own podcasts. Still others ask students to work together to create a multimedia website. These kinds of projects not only help students learn to work together, but educate them on technological tools they’ll need to use in their academic and professional lives. The popularity of these kinds of lessons isn’t likely to fade anytime soon.
  7. The rise of the tablet. Tablet computers come in many shapes and sizes, but as they grow smaller and more portable, they are becoming a fairly common addition to the American classroom. The iPad has been one such tablet device that has shown a lot of popularity and promise in recent years in the classroom. Great for doing everything from studying the periodic table to playing educational games, the app-based device has been a big trend in schools across the nation, with many shelling out millions to provide students with access to the devices. While some debate the effectiveness of tablet computers as a learning tool, experimentation with them in the classroom has had largely positive results from both teachers and students.
  8. Social media for education. When it was first created, Facebook was solely a place for college students to connect with one another. Today, just about everyone has a profile on the site, and it’s being used for a lot more than just rehashing weekend parties. In facts, many professors have begun using it as a way to connect with students, spark discussion and relay important assignment information. With the majority of college students able to access the site from their phones or other mobile devices, students have no excuse not to get involved in class, no matter where they are or how busy they may be. While social media in education is still tricky territory, as sites like Twitter and Facebook evolve, the ways they’re used in the classroom will likely become more refined and potentially more powerful in creating a better educational experience.
  9. Snack learning. One of the criticisms of the digital generation is that they have short attention spans. However true or untrue this may be, educators are taking note and developing learning tools that offer up snack sized bits of learning for students on the go. These single-serve educational bites may make it easier for students to tackle the ever-increasing amount of information they need to know, from mastering a programming language to learning the basics of American history and just about everything in between. Mobile devices are a perfect extension of this concept, allowing learners to engage in short bursts of learning while waiting in line, on the bus or sitting on the couch.
  10. Mobile learning in workplace training. Mobile learning isn’t just catching on in schools and colleges, it’s also becoming a part of the workplace training experience as well, providing information and a new format for testing understanding. With many businesses already supplying workers with smartphones for work, it makes sense to get the most out of these devices as possible. One way companies are doing this is by having experts share their expertise, either through blogs or a series of podcasts. Additionally, mobile devices are an excellent source of reference information should an employee ever encounter a situation with which he or she isn’t familiar. Performance support for employees can help reinforce their training and make for a stronger more confident workforce– something every business is undoubtedly looking to establish.

Source:  Online College